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Posts Tagged ‘Watergate’

“CBS News Correspondent Roger Mudd- CBS News covering President Richard Nixon’s resignation speech in August, 1974. (I wasn’t born yet!) …”

Source: This piece was originally posted at The New Democrat

CBS News covering President Richard Nixon’s resignation speech in August, 1974. (I wasn’t born yet!) Of course because of President Nixon’s involvement in the Watergate break in in 1972 where employees of the Richard Nixon Reelection Campaign, broke into Democratic National Headquarters at the Watergate Hotel in Washington in the summer of 1972. After it became clear because of President Nixon’s presidential tapes that the President ordered the coverup. he lost most of whatever support he had left in Congress. At least enough in the House and even in his own party to prevent him from being impeached by the House with a bipartisan majority and win a conviction trial in the Senate. The President would have been impeached by the House and convicted by the Senate. That is how Congress can remove the President and Vice President from office. Congressional Republicans led by Senator Barry Goldwater, but Senate Minority Leader Hugh Scott and House Minority Leader John Rhodes, told President Nixon that the gig was up, so to speak. Went to the White House and told the President he can’t survive Watergate and if he tries to he’ll be removed from off by Congress.

That is why President Richard Nixon resigned from office. Because had he not he would have faced a worst embarressment of being removed from office by Congress and perhaps losing half of his own party in the House and Senate on those votes. Senate Republicans told President Nixon that he might have twenty votes for acquittal in the Senate if it went that far. You need 34 to defeat impeachment in the Senate and Republicans had 45 seats in the Senate in that Congress. More than enough to defeat an impeachment trial if they’re united on it. President Nixon had calculated that he would probably get impeached by the Democratic House that had roughly 260 seats, but the win the conviction trial in the Senate. But Senator Goldwater told the President that he didn’t have enough votes in the Senate for that and that he Barry Goldwater would vote for conviction. Perhaps Richard Nixon did want to end this and save the country from seeng their President impeached and convicted. But it’s clear that a big part of him resigning was to save himself from further embarrassment.

This Democratic Congress of 1973-74, was ready to get past impeachment and deal with other issues. Like making sure the Vietnam War ended swiftly and properly, the country was going through a recession and lacked affordable energy, inflation was becoming a big problem, rising unemployment, etc. But just as long as President Nixon was removed one way or another from office. Whether they had to do that themselves or the President voluntarily stepped down. So as Roger Mudd and Dan Rather were talking about as far as whether the House would go through on impeachment anyway even with the President resigning, there was no appetite for that in either the Democratic Caucus or Republican Caucus. And the Democratic Senate wanted nothing to do with an impeachment trial and neither did Senate Republicans, especially if the President already decided to voluntarily resign. Richard Nixon being the master politician he was, knew when to fold and when he lost all support which is why he resigned from office.

World Opinion Forum-CBS News: Coverage of President Richard Nixon’s Resignation- Roger Mudd vs Dan Rather: ‘Go Soft on Nixon’

 

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Archie Bunker

Why Not, Look at the Other Candidates

Source: This piece was originally posted at The New Democrat

Oh the 1970s, a decade about sacrifice and millions of Americans learning about their government and their politicians and that they didn’t like a lot of them. But of course as George Carlin always said, “no one put a gun to your head and forced you to vote for. A or B or reelect A or B”. That we get the politicians and the government that we vote for. So who do voters who vote for the wrong people have to blame.

The 1970s starts off radically enough with the Vietnam War and millions of Americans wanting to get the hell out of there. And can you blame them with all the people we lost. To Vietnam War demonstrations with a crime family running the White House. Because they didn’t trust their own country and their own people and a lot of them voted for Richard Nixon. To Watergate and the Nixon team breaking into Democratic headquarters. That didn’t have a January heat wave in Alaska’s chance of defeating President Nixon for president. To a president essentially being forced to resign as president or be fired by Congress.

We go from Tricky Dick Nixon as president. To stumbling bumbling Gerry Ford as president, our own president who was never elected president or vice president. It gave Americans a taste of what communist rule looks like and they spit that out by voting for a peanut brain, I mean peanut farmer in Jimmy Carter for president. Whose idea of leadership was to blame America for the country’s problems.

It is a good thing I was only alive for four years of the 1970s. Because if I had to go through that whole decade and old enough to remember all of it, I might have ended up being institutionalized for depression. Because the 1970s was a depressing decade. Sure the women’s designer denim jeans revolution of the late 1970s helped and was great for men to see, but most of the rest of the decade was depressing.

Great on Yak: Archie Bunker on The 1970s

 

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Telling it The Way it Was

Telling it The Way it Was


Still the best news anchor America has ever seen. Walter Cronkite, was the CBS Evening News, as great of a title that would have been if that is what he represented. He wasn’t CBS News, again as great of an honor that would have been. He was network news. He was the gold standard for how good real news anchors are judged by. People who anchor real news shows and real news stories. Stories that have real importance to the country. Perhaps that don’t draw the best ratings, or are the most entertaining. But real-life stories that effect everyone in the country. A true news anchor and not an entertainment news anchor, covers current affairs and national affairs. Issues involving the entire country. Like our foreign policy, national security and economy, to use as examples.

Like the death of the President of the United States. A war where millions of Americans are stationed thousands of miles away in another country fighting someone else’s civil war. Or the death of a great civil rights leader, or political leader. Or a political scandal involving not just the White House, but the President of the United States and his involvement in that scandal. Or a national energy shortage that effect every single American and effects the national economy. Or the Great Deflation of the 1970s. That resulted in two recessions in that decade and led to the economic malaise of the late 1970s and early 1980s. Or peace treaties involving two major Middle Eastern countries. Or a hostage crisis involving several Americans being held hostage in a Middle Eastern country.

Walter Cronkite, anchored the coverage of all of these stories and issues that I mentioned. And I believe it’s very clear which issues and stories that I’m talking about exactly.Were there what would be called fluff stories on the CBS Evening News, like a panda being born at the National Zoo, or a major sports story, sure. All network newscasts have done that. And Cronkite wasn’t above that and perhaps shouldn’t have been. But Americans watched his newscast, because they wanted to know what was going on in the world especially in their own country. Get the latest economic news, news about the latest war we might be involved in. Issues that the President and his administration are pushing. What’s going on in Congress and the latest political news in and outside of Congress. And Cronkite was the best at this.

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